Have you ever wanted to visit the historical decks of the Titanic? Well, now you can, for a price tag of $105,129 USD.

The tale of the Titanic is one that almost everyone is familiar with. From Southampton, England to New York City, the Titanic departed on April 14th 1912 and collided with an iceberg just four days into her maiden voyage. It took roughly two hours for the Unsinkable Ship to rest at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean with only half its total occupants in the lifeboats.

Roughly 1,500 people lost their lives that day. It’s a grim tale that we can’t seem to leave to rest, or perhaps we are looking to learn from our mistakes. When I read about the tour originally, I was quite thrilled at the idea of getting to see the Titanic first hand (assuming the price tag isn’t an issue).

expedition titanic


The underwater tour of the Titanic 2018 is hosted by Blue Marble Private and allows divers to explore the underwater wreckage for approximately three hours. There’s another company, Bluefish, that sports different vehicles, longer dive times, but no dates or prices have been confirmed yet. Both tours will navigate through the bridge, deck, and the cavern where the grand staircase once stood.



This is the perfect opportunity to experience the tragedy of the Titanic first-hand.

That doesn’t sound right, does it?

The amount of loss that this single underwater site holds, has tainted this experience for some people, and others are quite against disturbing a gravesite.

When I asked a few colleagues how they felt about visiting the site of the sunken Titanic, I got some very strong opinions.

My one colleague was quite excited about the opportunity to visit the wreckage. When I asked him why, he replied, “It’s history. People’s stories ended down there and they deserve to be paid attention to.” – Ryan M.

Another colleague said, “For some people, it’s closure, but I can understand that people are attracted to the haunted aspect of it. As for myself, I wouldn’t go even if it was free. I’d be more interested in seeing the big fish than exploring a rusted wreck” – Maria C.

A third was quite adamant about not disturbing the wreckage because it may be disrespectful, “It is time to let these souls rest and find peace instead of poking about in their business.”

I, on the other hand, would be curious to attend, but not enough to schedule myself in for a 12 hour deep sea dive. I’d rather stick to museums where I can satisfy my love for history and macabre at the same time without getting my socks wet. Knowing what came before is a large part of enjoying museums and tours, and the history ends up being just as important as the experience.




The destruction of the Titanic is close at hand once again, but it’s not due to another iceberg on the horizon. “A 2016 study claimed that a recently discovered “extremophile bacteria” could eat away what’s left of the famous shipwreck inside 15 or 20 years,” reports CNN. This may boost interest in the Titanic wreckage for the next couple of years, and others around the world are trying to keep the Titanic dream alive by building her bigger, better, and with more lifeboats

So, get your tickets while you can. Thanks to inflation, you can purchase your ticket for the equivalent price of an original first-class ticket on the RMS Titanic in 1912.

What do you think about the Titanic Tour; is it grim or respectful?


Interesting Facts

  • The plot of Morgan Robertson’s novel “Futility” bears an uncanny resemblance to the Titanic disaster. The novel tells the story of the Titan, the largest ship ever built, billed as “unsinkable,” which strikes an iceberg in April and sinks. In the book, more than half the passengers die in the North Atlantic because of a lifeboat shortage. The book was published 14 years before the Titanic sank.
  • There’s an app for the Titanic; it’s published by The History Press.
  • The Titanic had four smoke stacks, but one of them was a dummy. It wasn’t hooked up to the furnace. It was merely for air ventilation.
  • The original price of a first class ticket in 1912 was £4,350. Exchanged today it would be valued at $6,143 USD. Due to inflation, that ticket is worth roughly £74,374 or $105,000 USD.


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Have you ever wanted to visit the historical decks of the Titanic? Well, now you can, for a price tag of $105,129 USD.